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Controlling with kindness.

The SPCA receives regular reports of bird infestation on buildings, houses and farms and is in the process of assessing several methods that are deemed to be cruel and unacceptable – for humane control the SPCA advises:-

  1. Use exclusion methods – i.e. netting / making areas inaccessible.
  2. Make an area available for birds to rest, drawing them away from the areas they they are not wanted.
  3. Do not leave feed out or feed birds, this draws in more birds.
  4. Remove eggs from the areas to prevent breeding from taking place, if you do not wish annual visits by the feathery creatures. (Only do this after you have checked with your local SPCA and Nature Conservation regarding legality as the birds may be a protected species.)
  5. Place strands of light wire across the perching areas, parallel with each other, not too widely apart, which will prevent the birds from perching.
  6. DO NOT use any poisons, glue or any kind of gels as these cause flight problems and or painful and secondary poisoning.
  7. In the case of farms, cover the crops with netting and plant or leave a separate crop for feeding purposes. This must be well away from the main farming crops to avoid spill over feeding.

 

Hunting / shooting birds does not solve the problem as others will come to feed / perch. A humane all-encompassing preventative programme must be put in place.

The real cause is breeding and preventative programmes on a national basis should be implemented.

NSPC APPALLED – JOHANNESBURG TO OBTAIN ANOTHER ELEPHANT.

The NSPCA was made aware that the Johannesburg Zoo is bringing in another elephant. This decision has been made following the death of one of their elephants, Kinkel, earlier this year – leaving their remaining elephant alone.
The captive environment for elephants at the Johannesburg Zoo is detrimental to any elephant’s well-being.
The NSPCA was informed that the decision was approved by the Johannesburg Metro which is run by the Democratic Alliance (DA). Both the Johannesburg Zoo and the DA profess to believe in and uphold the 5 Freedoms, an ethos which outlines basic animal welfare, yet the decision to introduce another elephant into a facility which does not meet these freedoms has been considered acceptable by both the Johannesburg Zoo and the Democratic Alliance.
The NSPCA will secure a humane alternative that is not only beneficial for the well-being of their remaining elephant, Lammie, but would also stop the endless and redundant cycle of continuously condemning elephants to captivity for many years to come.
“The NSPCA will continue to fight for Lammie and every other elephant that may be doomed to a life of captivity. We believe that moving Lammie to an approved sanctuary would be far more beneficial for her welfare. We have expressed our opinion to the Johannesburg Zoo as well as the City of Johannesburg’s mayor, Herman Mashaba” said Karen Trendler, manager of the NSPCAs Wildlife Trade & Trafficking portfolio.
The NSPCA challenges the DA to uplift Lammie’s welfare and make the correct decision to move Lammie to an appropriate and accredited sanctuary and to not condemn another elephant to a life of captivity.

Now is the time to prove your commitment to animal welfare.

Vice Chairlady

Vice Chairlady 2019

Sad Passing of uMngeni SPCA Volunteer.

Mary Bohmer 

16 April 1930 – 30 March 2018

 Mary Cade was born in 1930 on a remote, rural farm in Kenya – the eldest child and only girl, of 4 children. Life was financially tough for the family but was exciting and adventurous, as you can well imagine. Animals were always part of her life and she had numerous dogs and cats as pets, but also a horse, a bushbaby and even snakes. 

 Mary married Des Bohmer in 1950 and they had three children – Paul, Robert and Anne – who all now live overseas. She was a wonderful mother, grandmother and mother-in-law and a true rock for her family.

 Mary was a great talker, as those who knew her will know. Chatting was one of her hallmarks! But it enabled her to meet people and make new friends.

 Mary liked everyone and never put anyone down, nor did she gossip – great traits we could all learn from. She was truly a salt of the earth person. 

 She was incredibly selfless and always ready to help others, no matter the task. Over the years, she spent many hours volunteering for the SPCA Op shops in Howick and Merrivale and had previously helped at Riding for the Disabled. So, if you would like to donate to the SPCA, in her honour, please do so. It would be much appreciated.

 Mary was an interesting and interested person – someone who read lots and who was well informed on world events. 

 She was also adventurous and prepared to give most things a try. She would eat almost any food, could sleep anywhere, and always enjoyed going to new places. About the only thing that got her beat was the Karkloof zip-line that her grandchildren, Thomas and Emily, cajoled her into trying a couple of years ago!

 In the last 5 years she took 3 trips to Australia and New Zealand, spent three summers in the UK with her daughter, did a road trip around Namibia and visited Cape Town.

 Sadly, it was on her last trip to Hobart that she became unwell. In early March she had a small seizure, the first sign that she was suffering from multiple brain tumors. She declined rapidly, which, for her sake, was a blessing. But she never complained, except for feeling she was being a burden on her children looking after her. 

 

On the 30 March, Good Friday, she passed away peacefully at her son’s home, surrounded by all her children and her youngest brother, Richard, who was visiting from Perth.

 

She will be sorely missed but never forgotten. May she rest in peace. 

 

Caring for our staff.

Another very successful workshop was held on Compassion Fatigue by Dr Marlet Tromp. ‘To work is to earn a living, make money or make a difference. The challenge in the SPCA is not only to deal with the magnitude of people’s emotions, but also the emotional connection with animals and their suffering. The intention of this workshop is to understand compassion fatigue and manage these emotions to work preventatively.’

Taytum and Deanne Goddard do special!

 

Taytum and Deanne Goddard had their 4th birthday, instead of presents they asked for food for the cats and dogs at the kennels. Dresden is a friend. We are low so much appreciated.

Calves Tied Down On Bakkie.

On the 15th March Renee Karssing (check spelling on events Comm) observed a bakkie leaving Greendale with calves tied down.

Njabulo Hlongwane responded and stopped them on Main Road.

He informed me that they had 6 calves with the hind and fore limbs tied together with twine.

He was told to bring the bakkie to the SPCA.

Jabulani Mshengu and I inspected the animals and found the manner of transportation and the confinement of the calves unacceptable.

The driver was told that he cannot transport them in the current vehicle and needs to hire a trailer.

The calves were off loaded and housed at the clinic were we have shelter for small livestock.

The driver was issued with a warning and informed that should we find him transporting any livestock in an unsuitable vehicle,

charges in terms of the Animals Protection Act will be laid against him.

At 16.20 a vehicle arrived to fetch the calves, we were informed that they were going to adjust the seats so that they can accommodate the 6 calves.

We asked them if they think we are stupid, there was no way they are going to transport the calves to Impendle in that fancy vehicle.

They will go down the road and transfer the calves back into the bakkie and tie their limbs again. Unless they come with suitable transport,

the calves will not be released.

The calves were fed 2 litres each of calf feed. They were settled in. The one calve decided I was his mother and would not leave me.

When I left he came to the fence and followed bellowing as only calves can do. Once I gave him my fingers he was calm again.

Today that they 2 litres each breakfast and lunch. They not been collected as yet, if they are not we will house them in our isolation block over night as the weather is miserable.

 

Dudu

Baboons and Monkeys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some ways to prevent conflict

  • Don’t feed baboons or primates under any circumstances.
  • Ensure rubbish bins are tamper proof.
  • Erect electric fencing around landfill sites and rubbish dumps.
  • Ensure refuse is removed on a regular basis.
  • Ensure entrances, including windows, to buildings housing food matter are permanently primate proof.
  • Use of scare apparatus could be considered.

 

Ways to reduce injury or damage if you confront a baboon or primate

  • Do not get between it and its escape route.
  • Allow it right of way.
  • Do not challenge it.
  • Don’t maintain eye contact.
  • Don’t panic or run, slowly back off.

 

Baboons and Monkeys

BABOONS & MONKEYS DO NOT MAKE GOOD PETS

The words cute, cuddly, intriguing, funny and interesting will often come to one’s mind when watching baboons and monkeys playing in their ‘natural’ environment.

The words pest, invasion, vermin, vicious and scary come into many people’s minds when they confront the same animals in their gardens, homes or farms.

Why the difference in opinion?

Quite simply put is that both baboons and monkeys in the wild have not become reliant on humans for food and shelter and live a life of contentment, eating from natures food basket.

Once man encroaches upon the environment the space available to wildlife is drastically reduced. Their natural foraging areas and food source is then also diminished and they have to seek such in human settlements. This situation as well as well meaning people feeding them, bring them into direct conflict with humans.

For the most part baboons and monkeys don’t want any involvement with humans and would prefer to just be non-human primates doing non-human primate things. Hunger, thirst and adverse human activities displaces them and they have to seek alternative means to survive.

Along with this goes unnatural behaviour traits such as attacks on humans and pets. Scavenging in refuse bins and in kitchens becomes the norm. If cornered they may display aggressive behaviour towards the threat which is normally a human or his/her pet. Aggressive behaviour could take the form of challenging or even physical attack, which could in most cases have been avoided.

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Meet the team

John Lewis

Member of the uMngeni SPCA Executive committee. John is a past Chairman of the Society.

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Lots of people talk to animals.... Not very many listen, though.... That's the problem. ~Benjamin Hoff, The Tao of Pooh

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We support ONLY the circuses that DO NOT use animals of any kind to entertain the crowds. The use of wild animals in Circus acts is inhumane

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did you know ~ Elephants weigh about 5000kg, cows can weigh around 4000 to 5000kg! Like humans, Ellies tend to be right handed.Clever Ellie!

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