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Sad Passing of uMngeni SPCA Volunteer.

Mary Bohmer 

16 April 1930 – 30 March 2018

 Mary Cade was born in 1930 on a remote, rural farm in Kenya – the eldest child and only girl, of 4 children. Life was financially tough for the family but was exciting and adventurous, as you can well imagine. Animals were always part of her life and she had numerous dogs and cats as pets, but also a horse, a bushbaby and even snakes. 

 Mary married Des Bohmer in 1950 and they had three children – Paul, Robert and Anne – who all now live overseas. She was a wonderful mother, grandmother and mother-in-law and a true rock for her family.

 Mary was a great talker, as those who knew her will know. Chatting was one of her hallmarks! But it enabled her to meet people and make new friends.

 Mary liked everyone and never put anyone down, nor did she gossip – great traits we could all learn from. She was truly a salt of the earth person. 

 She was incredibly selfless and always ready to help others, no matter the task. Over the years, she spent many hours volunteering for the SPCA Op shops in Howick and Merrivale and had previously helped at Riding for the Disabled. So, if you would like to donate to the SPCA, in her honour, please do so. It would be much appreciated.

 Mary was an interesting and interested person – someone who read lots and who was well informed on world events. 

 She was also adventurous and prepared to give most things a try. She would eat almost any food, could sleep anywhere, and always enjoyed going to new places. About the only thing that got her beat was the Karkloof zip-line that her grandchildren, Thomas and Emily, cajoled her into trying a couple of years ago!

 In the last 5 years she took 3 trips to Australia and New Zealand, spent three summers in the UK with her daughter, did a road trip around Namibia and visited Cape Town.

 Sadly, it was on her last trip to Hobart that she became unwell. In early March she had a small seizure, the first sign that she was suffering from multiple brain tumors. She declined rapidly, which, for her sake, was a blessing. But she never complained, except for feeling she was being a burden on her children looking after her. 

 

On the 30 March, Good Friday, she passed away peacefully at her son’s home, surrounded by all her children and her youngest brother, Richard, who was visiting from Perth.

 

She will be sorely missed but never forgotten. May she rest in peace. 

 

Baboons and Monkeys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some ways to prevent conflict

  • Don’t feed baboons or primates under any circumstances.
  • Ensure rubbish bins are tamper proof.
  • Erect electric fencing around landfill sites and rubbish dumps.
  • Ensure refuse is removed on a regular basis.
  • Ensure entrances, including windows, to buildings housing food matter are permanently primate proof.
  • Use of scare apparatus could be considered.

 

Ways to reduce injury or damage if you confront a baboon or primate

  • Do not get between it and its escape route.
  • Allow it right of way.
  • Do not challenge it.
  • Don’t maintain eye contact.
  • Don’t panic or run, slowly back off.

 

Baboons and Monkeys

BABOONS & MONKEYS DO NOT MAKE GOOD PETS

The words cute, cuddly, intriguing, funny and interesting will often come to one’s mind when watching baboons and monkeys playing in their ‘natural’ environment.

The words pest, invasion, vermin, vicious and scary come into many people’s minds when they confront the same animals in their gardens, homes or farms.

Why the difference in opinion?

Quite simply put is that both baboons and monkeys in the wild have not become reliant on humans for food and shelter and live a life of contentment, eating from natures food basket.

Once man encroaches upon the environment the space available to wildlife is drastically reduced. Their natural foraging areas and food source is then also diminished and they have to seek such in human settlements. This situation as well as well meaning people feeding them, bring them into direct conflict with humans.

For the most part baboons and monkeys don’t want any involvement with humans and would prefer to just be non-human primates doing non-human primate things. Hunger, thirst and adverse human activities displaces them and they have to seek alternative means to survive.

Along with this goes unnatural behaviour traits such as attacks on humans and pets. Scavenging in refuse bins and in kitchens becomes the norm. If cornered they may display aggressive behaviour towards the threat which is normally a human or his/her pet. Aggressive behaviour could take the form of challenging or even physical attack, which could in most cases have been avoided.

Dog Walking Volunteers Needed

dog walking pics1

Dogs need walks to keep them healthy and agile. It even helps timid or fearful dogs build confidence.

We are looking for some volunteers to help walk our pooches. We love knowing they are able to enjoy the outdoors as much as we do. It also gives you the chance to get fit with the dogs.

Please note that all volunteers must be 18 and over and be prepared to walk on Saturday mornings from 8am to 10am. If a Public Holiday or long weekend falls on a Saturday, the kennels will be closed therefore on those days there will not be any dog walking.

If you are interested in volunteering some of your time for our dogs, please contact our kennels on 033-3304557. Thank you!